Science Market Update

New Lab Funding Awarded To UCSB For Research On Polycystic Kidney Disease

Posted by Laura Braden on Tue, Mar 17, 2015

Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) is considered to be one of the most fatal genetic diseases that affects more then 500,000 people in the United States. This disease, caused by a mutation in certain genes, causes the growth of cysts on the kidneys, which lead to kidney enlargement and failure. The are currently no treatments to permanently cure or halt the progression of this disease. Current solutions for PKD are receiving either a kidney transplant or staying on dialysis for the rest of ones life, neither of which are ideal situations.  

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Tags: CA, new research funding, Southwest, University of California Santa Barbara, 2015, UCSB, Santa Barbara, kidney disease, Polycystic Kidney Disease

University of Colorado Receives $1.5 Million for Bone Pathology Research

Posted by Laura Braden on Tue, Feb 10, 2015

In 1930 when Doctor Samuel Fosdick Jones retired from his medical practice and teaching at the University of Colorado, the field of bone pathology research was new and emerging. In order to help support this research area, he set up a trust fund that, years after his death, would grant the University of Colorado funding to use in support of this research field. (Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons).

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Tags: Southwest, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 2015, BioResearch Product Faire Event, CO, new funding, Fitz, Aurora, Orthopedics, bone pathology

TMC Researchers Test Mushroom Extract to Beat HPV

Posted by Laura Braden on Fri, Jan 16, 2015

Imagine knowing that you have a disease that could potentially lead to cancer, and having to live in a state of constant uncertainty about whether or not a tumor would develop. For people with Human Papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States, this is a reality. HPV is a serious disease that can lead to cervical cancer (along with other types). Although there is now a vaccines for the disease, there is no known cure for those already afflicted. Life science researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center (UTHealth) in Houston have recently discovered that an extract from shiitake mushrooms could potentially lead to a cure for HPV. 

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Tags: Texas Medical Center, Southwest, 2015, tmc, BioResearch Product Faire Event, Houston, TX, Shiitake Mushrooms, HPV, Active Hexose Correlated Compound, Mushrooms, AHCC

Boulder Researcher Awarded $3.7 Million to Study Zinc in the Human Body

Posted by Laura Braden on Wed, Jan 14, 2015

Every year, the National Institutes of Health gives out the NIH Director's Pioneer Award to deserving researchers working on biomedical and behavioral research projects with innovative approaches to challenging problems. In 2014, 10 awards were given out to researchers at different institutions around the country.

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Tags: Southwest, University of Colorado Boulder, 2015, BioResearch Product Faire Event, CO, Boulder, UCO, Zinc, transition metals, gene expression

Largest Molecular Cage With Potential to Deliver Vaccines Developed At UCLA

Posted by Laura Braden on Tue, Jan 06, 2015

Biochemists at the University of California, Los Angeles recently developed the largest molecular "cage" ever created. This "cage", a cube-like structure, was constructed from 24 copies of a single protein that has the ability to self-assemble into a cage. This newly created cage could potentially lead to new ways of delivering vaccines to infected cells. 

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Tags: CA, University of California Los Angeles, Southwest, 2015, LAVS, UCLA, Biotechnology Vendor Showcase

USC Expecting New Biomedical Research Center in 2017

Posted by Laura Braden on Wed, Dec 24, 2014

In 2017, the University of Southern California will be a little bit larger, thanks to the addition of a new research center. Made possible by a $50 million donation from Gary and Alya Michelson, the USC Michelson Center for Convergence Bioscience will be the largest building on the USC campus (once completed) and will foster collaboration between researchers from different science disciplines. 

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Tags: CA, University of Southern California, Southwest, USC, Los Angeles, 2015, BioResearch Product Faire Event

UNR Receives $5.4M to Establish New Core Facilities To Help Research Smooth Muscle Plasticity

Posted by Laura Braden on Mon, Dec 22, 2014

The Centers for Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) gives out annual awards to assist researchers with biomedical research projects, as well as to help with the establishment of new university core facilities that will help carry out the objectives of these research projects. Kenton Sanders, PhD, from the University of Nevada School of Medicine in Reno, recently received Phase 3 COBRE funding in the amount of $5.4 million over five years to continue his research of Smooth Muscle Plasticity, as well as to establish new core facilities that will help with this research. (See map below for states receiving COBRE funding. Map created here)

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Tags: University of Nevada Reno, UNR, Southwest, 2015, BioResearch Product Faire Event, NV, Reno

UC San Diego Engages in World Class Life Science Research

Posted by David Larsen on Fri, Dec 12, 2014


The University of California, San Diego is one of only five public universities in the U.S. to make the top 20 list in a new ranking of the world’s top 500 colleges. The campus took the No. 18 spot in U.S. News and World Report’s first-ever global ranking of universities which measured factors such as research, global and regional reputation, international collaboration as well as number of highly-cited papers and doctorates awarded. And with unending support and grants flowing in, UC San Diego is able to invest in the latest cutting edge tools for this world class research. 

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Tags: CA, Southwest, San diego Biotech, 2015, San Diego, SDVS, UC San Diego, Biotechnology Vendor Showcase Event

UCSB Researchers Create Nanoparticles To Act Like Blood Platelets

Posted by Laura Braden on Wed, Dec 10, 2014

When someone gets an open wound or injury, one of the first things the body does is try to stop the flow of blood. The body does this by forming clots that turn the blood from liquid to gel to plug the wound and stop the body from bleeding out. If this clotting doesn't happen right away, it makes further treatment and healing of the wound more difficult or impossible. To help with the clotting process, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara have created nanoparticles that resemble blood platelets that can be used to speed up the healing process and create clots faster to decrease blood loss from an injury.

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Tags: CA, Southwest, 2015, BioResearch Product Faire Event, UCSB, Santa Barbara

Arsenic Being Considered as a Cancer Fighting Tool

Posted by David Larsen on Sat, Dec 06, 2014


The Environmental Protection Agency limits the amount of arsenic in U.S. public drinking water to 10 parts per billion (ppb). Water that comes from privately owned wells may contain higher levels of arsenic, especially in areas where the groundwater flows over arsenic-rich bedrock. In a recent study done by UC Berkeley, arsenic was found to potentially show benefits as a cancer fighting agent.

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Tags: CA, water, cancer research, Southwest, 2015, Berkeley, BioResearch Product Faire Event, UC Berkeley, UCBerk

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