Science Market Update

New WSU Research Building Will Allow Breakthrough Biomedical Research

Posted by Katheryn Rein on Fri, Jul 19, 2013

On May 2nd, 2013, a very important addition to the WSU Pullman campus was dedicated. The Veterinary and Biomedical Research Building (VMRB) is now the seventh connected building in the WSU Research and Educational Complex. This new building will foster research relating specifically to biomedical questions revolving around human and animal health.


VBRB on the WSU Campus

This development has been under construction since August 2010 and is the most newly added member to the Research and Educational Complex on the WSU Pullman campus. This $96 million dollar investment by WSU will focus on many health issues including:

  • Heart health: How, by uncovering the biophysical mechanisms of cardiac muscle contraction, new discoveries into cardiac function and disease can be revealed.
  • Emotional health: How understanding the basis of emotions of companion and production animals can improve the lives of people with affective disorders.
  • Sleep and circadian rhythms: How rhythms, dysrhythms, and circadian biology affect animal biology and can improve and inhibit daily functions in animals and people.
  • Neurological diseases: How neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, can be treated more effectively by discovering the underlying causes and subsequently creating treatments to repair the loss of functionality.
  • Obesity and Diabetes: How obesity and diabetes can be prevented by studying and understanding the relationship between the consumption of food and how energy is consequently regulated into the body.
  • Drug addiction: How the biological actions of commonly abused drugs can be used to reverse the destrctive nature of addiction and help prevent the relapses of drug users.

This research facility is operating east of the Martin Stadium entrance and south of the Beasley Coliseum parking lot. This building boasts 77,250 net square feet (128,000 gross square feet) of state-of-the-art space, highly suitable for biomedical research, health science teaching, and research programs. Also included in this structure is a vivarium (an indoor facility for safely housing animals and plants in their natural environments for humane scientific observation), which will allow for gene targeting of the animals and provide necessary quarantined space to guarantee uncontaminated research. These labs and offices were specifically designed with the Veterinary Medicine Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience in mind.

On the subject of this exciting new development, WSU regent Scott Carson remarks, “This building is the beginning. It’s our opportunity to compete for those wonderful young people that will be coming here in the future - the researchers that will do wonderful work because of the collaborative environment that this represents.”

Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) is one of the top leaders in research benefiting to animal and human health and well being. In fact, solely during the 2006 fiscal year, the research faculty placed the CVM well into the top tier of all veterinary schools by working with over $12.5 million in competitively funded research.

Some of these specialized areas are:

*Food & water-borne diseases

*Cardiovascular medicine & physiology

*Immunology and infectious diseases

*Neurobiology

*Microbial genomics and proteomics 

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Tags: Biomedical Research Funding, WA research, WA, biomedical research, Washington, Washington State University, Northwest, Washington Life Science, buiding. new building, biomedical research, BioResearch Product Faire Event, 2013, WSU Pullman, research science information, 2014, WSU, Pullman

Fred Hutchinson Researches Risk Reduction of Esophageal Cancer

Posted by Jennifer Nieuwkerk on Mon, Jul 01, 2013

A new study by science researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that a number of lifestyle changes may be able to reduce the risk of or manage esophageal cancer. People who don’t smoke, keep their weight down, get regular exercise, eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, don’t eat four hours before they go to sleep, and avoid foods and beverages that give you heartburn (including caffeine, alcohol, chocolate, peppermint, onions, green peppers and foods that are high in fat) have a greatly reduced risk of getting esophageal cancer. Another Fred Hutchinson study found that cholesterol-reducing drugs are also associated with reduced risk.

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Tags: Medical Research, Medical Research, cancer research, WA research, WA, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Washington, Northwest, Cancer Center, Cancer Treatment, Seattle, Washington Life Science, BioResearch Product Faire Event, 2013, research science information, 2014, Hutch

UW Translational Research Gets $65 Million in New NIH Funding

Posted by Dylan Fitzwater on Wed, Aug 29, 2012


The University of Washington, Seattle recently received a $65 million grant from the NIH to help improve and streamline the UW Institute of Translational Health Sciences (ITHS) research program. This is the second grant of this type awarded to UW and will fund the program over a five year period. 

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Tags: Funding, WA research, WA, NIH, Translational Research, Washington, University of Washington, Translational Research, new research grants, Seattle, 2012, UW, Front Line event, WSU

Washington Life Science Consortium Advances Prostate Cancer Research

Posted by Dylan Fitzwater on Tue, Aug 14, 2012

The Washington-based Pacific Northwest Prostate Cancer SPORE (Specialized Programs of Research Excellence) is a cutting-edge life science consortium which includes several research centers throughout Washington State and British Columbia. The consortium focuses on the genetic mechanisms of prostate cancer to better develop effective treatments for the disease.

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Tags: WA research, NIH, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, research grant, 2012, Washington Life Science, washington life science consortium, BioResearch Product Faire Event, UW, Front Line event

UW Genomics Researchers Find Genes Linked to Autism in the Exome

Posted by Dylan Fitzwater on Mon, Jul 04, 2011

A team of Genomics Researchers at the University of Washington, Seattle have recently uncovered several sporadic gene mutations in the protein producing areas of the genome, called the exome, that may be linked to autism spectrum disorders. The scientists used the latest molecular biology techniques as well as parallel sequencing to simultaneously examine the exomes of several children with a certain form of autism.

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Tags: WA research, WA, Univ of Washington, Genomics, genome research, Autism, Exome, Northwest

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