Science Market Update

WSU Researcher Makes Breakthrough In Improving Crop Yields

Posted by Emily Olson on Fri, Oct 21, 2016

Mechthild Tegeder, a professor of Plant Molecular Physiology at Washington State University, has designed a way to dramatically increase the yield and quality of soybeans. Tegeder accomplished this by developing a novel way to double the amount of nitrogen fixed by the plants. The agricultural research study indicates a breakthrough that could help meet society's need to feed an increasing population while also protecting the environment.

Read More

Tags: Washington, WSU Pullman, WA, Washington State University Pullman, agriculture, WSU, Washington State University, agricultural, Northwest Region, research news, vegetable crops, agricultural business, agribusiness

WSU Partners to Offer Genetic Cancer Screenings

Posted by Robert Larkin on Tue, Sep 29, 2015

Washington State University, in collaboration with a genetics testing company in India, is providing cancer patients with comprehensive testing for determining effective prostate and breast cancer treatments.

Read More

Tags: Washington, WSU Pullman, Microbiology, WA, cancer research, WSU, Washington State University, Cancer Treatment, pharmaceutical, 2015, Biomarkers, Genetics, Northwest Region, Pullman, BioResearch Product Faire™

WSU Researcher Receives $2M for Prostate Cancer Trials

Posted by Robert Larkin on Fri, May 29, 2015

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men, with about 200,000 men diagnosed yearly and an approximately 10% death rate, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore, prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races and Hispanic origin populations.

Read More

Tags: Bioresearch, WSU Pullman, Washington University, WA, cancer research, Washington State University, 2015, BioResearch Product Faire Event, Research Funding, Pullman, Prostate cancer

New Research Facility for Grain Studies at WSU Pullman Gets $5M Grant

Posted by Jennifer Nieuwkerk on Fri, Sep 19, 2014

Washington State University, Pullman is home to one of the top plant science research departments in the country. Plant science research is a pressing issue for today’s scientists because it affects how we respond to climate change, helps us grow enough food and protects food from pests and pathogens. It’s exciting for both WSU researchers and interested readers alike, then, that the Washington Grain Commission announced they will give $5 million in life science funding towards a new research facility expansion that will advance grain studies at Washington State University, Pullman.

“When the Washington Grain Commission asked researchers at WSU what they felt the biggest limiting factor for moving their research forward was, they told us they needed more greenhouse space,” said Washington Grain Commission Chairman Steve Claassen. “This will be a huge benefit to Washington grain growers as they will be able to plant improved varieties of wheat and barley and they will be available sooner.”

Read More

Tags: 2014, Washington University St. Louis, WSU Pullman, Washington State University Pullman, WSU

New WSU Research Building Will Allow Breakthrough Biomedical Research

Posted by Katheryn Rein on Fri, Jul 19, 2013

On May 2nd, 2013, a very important addition to the WSU Pullman campus was dedicated. The Veterinary and Biomedical Research Building (VMRB) is now the seventh connected building in the WSU Research and Educational Complex. This new building will foster research relating specifically to biomedical questions revolving around human and animal health.


VBRB on the WSU Campus

This development has been under construction since August 2010 and is the most newly added member to the Research and Educational Complex on the WSU Pullman campus. This $96 million dollar investment by WSU will focus on many health issues including:

  • Heart health: How, by uncovering the biophysical mechanisms of cardiac muscle contraction, new discoveries into cardiac function and disease can be revealed.
  • Emotional health: How understanding the basis of emotions of companion and production animals can improve the lives of people with affective disorders.
  • Sleep and circadian rhythms: How rhythms, dysrhythms, and circadian biology affect animal biology and can improve and inhibit daily functions in animals and people.
  • Neurological diseases: How neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, can be treated more effectively by discovering the underlying causes and subsequently creating treatments to repair the loss of functionality.
  • Obesity and Diabetes: How obesity and diabetes can be prevented by studying and understanding the relationship between the consumption of food and how energy is consequently regulated into the body.
  • Drug addiction: How the biological actions of commonly abused drugs can be used to reverse the destrctive nature of addiction and help prevent the relapses of drug users.

This research facility is operating east of the Martin Stadium entrance and south of the Beasley Coliseum parking lot. This building boasts 77,250 net square feet (128,000 gross square feet) of state-of-the-art space, highly suitable for biomedical research, health science teaching, and research programs. Also included in this structure is a vivarium (an indoor facility for safely housing animals and plants in their natural environments for humane scientific observation), which will allow for gene targeting of the animals and provide necessary quarantined space to guarantee uncontaminated research. These labs and offices were specifically designed with the Veterinary Medicine Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience in mind.

On the subject of this exciting new development, WSU regent Scott Carson remarks, “This building is the beginning. It’s our opportunity to compete for those wonderful young people that will be coming here in the future - the researchers that will do wonderful work because of the collaborative environment that this represents.”

Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) is one of the top leaders in research benefiting to animal and human health and well being. In fact, solely during the 2006 fiscal year, the research faculty placed the CVM well into the top tier of all veterinary schools by working with over $12.5 million in competitively funded research.

Some of these specialized areas are:

*Food & water-borne diseases

*Cardiovascular medicine & physiology

*Immunology and infectious diseases

*Neurobiology

*Microbial genomics and proteomics 

Read More

Tags: 2014, 2013, biomedical research, Washington, WSU Pullman, WA, Northwest, WA research, WSU, Washington State University, Washington Life Science, BioResearch Product Faire Event, buiding. new building, research science information, Biomedical Research Funding, Pullman

WSU Veterinary Microbiology Lab Tracks West Nile, + New Vet Med Research Building

Posted by Jaimee Saliba on Thu, Sep 20, 2012

The Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (WADDL) within the College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University in Pullman is one of an elite group of veterinary facilities that use sophisticated molecular tools to diagnose disease, with labs for bacteriology, parasitology, pathology, serology, and virology. One threat they've been keeping a particularly keen eye out for this summer is West Nile Virus, which they have in fact found in horses, and which led the State to issue warnings for both animals (to have them vaccinated) and humans (to take extra precautions). West Nile is transmitted from infected birds, through biting mosquitos, and on to larger warm-blooded creatures. Because this has been such a hot, dry summer across most of the U.S., birds and mosquitos are finding themselves more often sharing the same rare watering hole, which may be causing the rise in West Nile cases. West Nile is an example of a zoonotic disease, meaning that it can be transfered between species. The role of veterinary labs like WADDL in tracking and identifying cases of these diseases is doubly important, then, as they work to prevent epidemics in our animals as well as ourselves.

Read More

Tags: Washington, WSU Pullman, WA, Northwest, New research facilities, Washington State University, veterinary medicine, 2012, animal science, Front Line event, new construction

Connect With Us   Like Us on Facebook   Follow Us on Twitter   See our latest photos!   Join Us on Google +   Find Us on LinkedIn   Pin our latest stories!

Subscribe to Company News

Subscribe to this blog!