Science Market Update

Research Funding for University of Georgia Includes Over $37M from NIH

Posted by Rebecca Partridge on Mon, Aug 28, 2017

Total research and development expenditures for the University of Georgia, Athens (UGA) reached an all-time high of $458 million. This is a 31% increase in R&D expenditures since the 2013 fiscal year. Over the past three years, externally funded research activities have climbed by 37% to reach $198 million in fiscal 2017. These expenditures are funded in part by federal grants and contracts. For example: in the first seven months of 2017 the University received 96 research project grants from the National Institute of Health (NIH). They total $37.2 million. The rest of their research funding comes from foundations, corporations, as well as the state of Georgia.

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Tags: biomedical research, University of Georgia Athens, University of Georgia, NIH funded Research Projects, UGA, laboratory equipment suppliers, lab suppliers, BioResearch Product Faire, Laboratory product sales, Biotechnology trade show, NIH awards 2017, 2017 research funding

$2.27M Research Grant to University of Georgia, Athens to Study Gene Editing

Posted by Rebecca Partridge on Wed, Feb 15, 2017

The National Institute of Health (NIH) awarded the University of Georgia a $2.27 Million grant to study a powerful gene editing tool known as CRISPR-Cas. In nature, CRISPR-Cas is a defense mechanism that single-celled organisms such as bacteria use to ward off attacks from viruses and other invaders. For scientists the CISPR-Cas9 system holds a potential tool to edit precise sequences of DNA and silence the genes that predispose some people to diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disorders and mental illness.

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Tags: biomedical research, University of Georgia Athens, University of Georgia, DNA Research, UGA, Biotechnology Vendor Fair, Biotechnology trade show

Texas Medical Center Researchers Find New Way of Treating Spina Bifida

Posted by Rebecca Partridge on Mon, Oct 24, 2016

Researchers at Texas Medical Center’s McGovern School of Medicine piloted a revolutionary way of treating spina bifida patients in utero. The new method utilizes a patch made from human umbilical cord and the regenerative tissue does not cause scarring, which often leads to complications. Recent clinical trials preformed at TMC’s Fetal Center at Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital showed improved outcomes for babies inflicted with the birth defect.       

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Tags: biomedical research, Texas Medical Center, tmc, Biotechnology Vendor Fair, laboratory equipment sales, spinal cord injury, McGovern Medical School, Huston, Texas, spina bifida

UCLA Pioneers New Approach to Coma Treatment

Posted by Rebecca Partridge on Fri, Sep 30, 2016

In a first of its kind study, researchers at UCLA utilized ultrasound to “jump start” the brain of a man with severe brain injury who was recovering from a coma. According to the UCLA Newsroom, the 25 year old man could only perform small, limited movements when instructed and “showed minimal signs of consciousness” before the procedure. Three days after the treatment, he regained full consciousness and language comprehension. He could reliably communicate by shaking or nodding his head.  Five days after, the patient attempted to walk for the first time since the coma.

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Tags: University of California Los Angeles, biomedical research, brain research, UCLA, UCLA research funding, Dana foundation, Tiny Blue Dot Foundation, Dr. Martin Monti

University of Arizona Receives $7M in Research Funding for Asthma Study

Posted by Rebecca Partridge on Mon, Sep 26, 2016

The National Institute of Health awarded a five year, $7 million grant to Dr. Monica Kraft at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson.  The funding will support a research study titled, “Dysfunction of Innate Immunity in Asthma,” which will seek to improve our understanding of mediators that help control lung inflammation. This in turn may lead to improved therapies for reducing severe asthma attacks.

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Tags: biomedical research, Biotech Event, UAZ, Research Funding, NIH grant, University of Arizona Tucson, UA, Asthma research, BioResearch Product Faire™

Duke Scientists Use Zebrafish to Fight Deadly Brain Infections

Posted by Robert Larkin on Mon, Nov 23, 2015

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Tags: East Coast Bioscience Shows, biomedical research, Medical Research, Duke University, North Carolina, disease research, Research Funding, Durham, NC, Duke, Southern Region, 2016, BioResearch Product Faire™, duke medicine

New WSU Research Building Will Allow Breakthrough Biomedical Research

Posted by Katheryn Rein on Fri, Jul 19, 2013

On May 2nd, 2013, a very important addition to the WSU Pullman campus was dedicated. The Veterinary and Biomedical Research Building (VMRB) is now the seventh connected building in the WSU Research and Educational Complex. This new building will foster research relating specifically to biomedical questions revolving around human and animal health.


VBRB on the WSU Campus

This development has been under construction since August 2010 and is the most newly added member to the Research and Educational Complex on the WSU Pullman campus. This $96 million dollar investment by WSU will focus on many health issues including:

  • Heart health: How, by uncovering the biophysical mechanisms of cardiac muscle contraction, new discoveries into cardiac function and disease can be revealed.
  • Emotional health: How understanding the basis of emotions of companion and production animals can improve the lives of people with affective disorders.
  • Sleep and circadian rhythms: How rhythms, dysrhythms, and circadian biology affect animal biology and can improve and inhibit daily functions in animals and people.
  • Neurological diseases: How neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s disease, can be treated more effectively by discovering the underlying causes and subsequently creating treatments to repair the loss of functionality.
  • Obesity and Diabetes: How obesity and diabetes can be prevented by studying and understanding the relationship between the consumption of food and how energy is consequently regulated into the body.
  • Drug addiction: How the biological actions of commonly abused drugs can be used to reverse the destrctive nature of addiction and help prevent the relapses of drug users.

This research facility is operating east of the Martin Stadium entrance and south of the Beasley Coliseum parking lot. This building boasts 77,250 net square feet (128,000 gross square feet) of state-of-the-art space, highly suitable for biomedical research, health science teaching, and research programs. Also included in this structure is a vivarium (an indoor facility for safely housing animals and plants in their natural environments for humane scientific observation), which will allow for gene targeting of the animals and provide necessary quarantined space to guarantee uncontaminated research. These labs and offices were specifically designed with the Veterinary Medicine Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience in mind.

On the subject of this exciting new development, WSU regent Scott Carson remarks, “This building is the beginning. It’s our opportunity to compete for those wonderful young people that will be coming here in the future - the researchers that will do wonderful work because of the collaborative environment that this represents.”

Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) is one of the top leaders in research benefiting to animal and human health and well being. In fact, solely during the 2006 fiscal year, the research faculty placed the CVM well into the top tier of all veterinary schools by working with over $12.5 million in competitively funded research.

Some of these specialized areas are:

*Food & water-borne diseases

*Cardiovascular medicine & physiology

*Immunology and infectious diseases

*Neurobiology

*Microbial genomics and proteomics 

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Tags: 2014, 2013, biomedical research, Washington, WSU Pullman, WA, Northwest, WA research, WSU, Washington State University, Washington Life Science, BioResearch Product Faire Event, buiding. new building, research science information, Biomedical Research Funding, Pullman

Anschutz Medical Campus Research Scientists Find Molecules To Reduce Anesthesia Damage

Posted by BCI Staff on Fri, Jan 04, 2013

Each year millions of Americans risk undergoing surgery for a variety of problems such as organ transplants, mending broken bones and cosmetic surgeries. Often surgery is necessary to fix ongoing health problems with the benefits of the surgery usually outweighing the risks. Despite the potential risks to surgery patients, in the United States more than 48 million surgeries are performed each year. In most cases, undergoing surgery is relatively risk free, but not always.

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Tags: 2014, Bioscience research, 2013, biomedical research, University of Colorado, Medical Research, Drug Discovery, DNA Research, Southwest, National Jewish Health, Anschutz Medical Campus, BioResearch Product Faire Front Line Event, BioResearch Product Faire Event, Denver, CO, public health, NJH, Fitz, Aurora

New $10 Million COBRE Grant For UNR Neuroscience Research

Posted by BCI Staff on Thu, Dec 13, 2012

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Tags: biomedical research, 2012 Research Funding, University of Nevada Reno, UNR, Nevada, 2012, Neuroscience, Front Line event, NV, Reno, Biomedical Research Funding

Rockefeller Research Shows White Blood Cells Not Lone Warriors in Immune Response

Posted by Jaimee Saliba on Tue, Dec 04, 2012

Researchers in the St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases at Rockefeller University have recently published the results of a study that demonstrates how organs like the brain have their own defense systems which, when disrupted, can permit disease despite a healthy white blood cell count. The key is the production of interferon, which are proteins triggered by a receptor called TLR3 that send up the alarm to fight infection (by interfering with the pathogen's reproduction). When that TLR3 receptor is faulty on a neuron or other brain cell, no interferon is produced and the patient can suffer a disease of the brain even though that same pathogen is being combatted effectively in other parts of the body. We now know there seem to be localized systems of immune response within specific organs, and that interferon therapy may help patients with rare localized diseases. 

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Tags: Rockefeller University, biomedical research, Stem cell research, New York, 2012, Immune System, brain research, BioResearch Product Faire Event, NY, New York City

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